News & Articles: Special Interest Communities

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ndios ganharo para preservar floresta

The Tembé indigenous group, from the Brazilian state of Pará, hope to close the first contract in Brazil for the preservation of an Indigenous Territory through the sale of carbon credits before the end of May. The contract has been approved by FUNAI (Brazil's Federal Indian Agency) and the Federal University of Par¡, but has not yet been approved by the Temb people. The credits will be sold by the Brazilian company C-TRADE on the voluntary market. 85% of the profits from the sale of the carbon credits will be given directly to the tribe. Although the exact value has not yet been determined, they should be worth more than 1 million reais a year (approximately 480,000 USD). This money will be invested in community projects which have already started (such as honey production) and the remainder distributed equally between the families. FUNAI is concerned, however, that those who administer the funds will keep it for themselves, so benefits will not reach the whole community. (In Portuguese)

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Lima To Invest $110 Million in Green Infrastructure And Climate Adaptation

The city of Lima made headlines around the world when it announced it was funneling some of its water fees into a program to restore pre-Incan structures that capture excess rainwater in the rainy season and redirect into the mountain, so that it’s available in the dry season. That program, however, is just a small part of a massive green infrastructure program that could serve as a model for cities around the world.

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Lima To Invest $110 Million in Green Infrastructure And Climate Adaptation

The city of Lima made headlines around the world when it announced it was funneling some of its water fees into a program to restore pre-Incan structures that capture excess rainwater in the rainy season and redirect into the mountain, so that it’s available in the dry season. That program, however, is just a small part of a massive green infrastructure program that could serve as a model for cities around the world.

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Emerging From The Darkness: New Process Aims To Tackle Black Carbon

Soot and smoke no longer blanket London and other Western cities like they once did, but these and other forms of “black carbon” continue to plague families in developing countries. Now a new Gold Standard methodology will offer clean cookstoves projects the chance to access a new source of funding for reducing these emissions.

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This Week In Biodiversity: Choose Your Own Adventure

The argument over voluntary approaches to conserve at risk-species like the greater sage-grouse isn’t waning. Meanwhile, new research applying the mitigation hierarchy to the agriculture and forestry sectors finds net positive impacts for biodiversity are possible and a separate report finds commodity subsidies driving deforestation vastly outweigh conservation finance to protect forests.

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This Week In Forest Carbon: REDD Gets Sweeter

The Tambopata REDD, based in Peru, aims to pair carbon finance with sustainable cocoa production with help from a $7 million investment by Althelia Climate Fund. Rather than rely on carbon finance long term, the project is designed to use offset sales as the start-up capital to set up the sustainable cocoa production – which over time will become the main revenue stream for farmers.

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Where Chocolate Meets Carbon: One Peruvian Project Finds The Sweet Spot

The Althelia Climate Fund’s $7 million investment in the Madre de Dios region of Peru aims to support 1,100 farmers on sustainable cocoa production and protect a biodiverse national reserve. It’s a marriage of avoided deforestation and sustainable commodity production that is projected to pay off in more ways than one.

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The Tolo River Community Project: The Importance Of Inclusion

Four years ago, the Tolo River People of Colombia voted to use carbon finance to save their forest. That decision, however, came after three years of debate, and it presaged an even longer process of development and implementation. Here’s how the Tolo River people built their REDD project and prepared to sell offsets.